Mixing Hydraulic Oil: Can You Combine 46 and 68?

Are you a DIYer who loves to tinker with hydraulic systems? Or you’re a professional mechanic looking to save time and money on routine maintenance. 

Whatever the case, it’s possible to mix different grades of hydraulic oil?, particularly 46 and 68. After all, with so many different options on the market, it can be tempting to mix and match to get the job done. 

No, you should not combine 46 and 68 hydraulic oil.

But before you reach for that bottle of 46-weight and mix it with your 68-weight, there are a few things you need to know. 

In this article, we’ll explore whether or not you can combine these two popular grades of hydraulic oil and what the potential consequences might be. So please sit back, grab a cup of coffee, and let’s get started!

What is Hydraulic Oil Viscosity?

Hydraulic oil viscosity is the oil’s resistance to flow, determined by temperature, pressure, and fluid type. 

Viscosity is critical because it affects the hydraulic system’s efficiency and performance. If viscosity is too low, it can cause leakage and component wear; if it’s too high, it can increase resistance to flow and energy consumption. 

Rating standards like ISO and SAE define viscosity ranges for different hydraulic oil grades to ensure consistency. 

By selecting the correct viscosity grade and adhering to standards, you can maintain optimal hydraulic system performance and avoid unnecessary wear and tear.

Differences between 46 and 68 Hydraulic Oil

Hydraulic oil is a fluid used in hydraulic systems to transfer power and energy. 

While hydraulic oils can come in different grades and types, two of the most common ones are 46 and 68.

Here’s a table comparing the differences between 46 and 68 hydraulic oil:

Sure, here’s a table comparing the differences between 46 and 68 hydraulic oil:

Property46 Hydraulic Oil68 Hydraulic Oil
ViscosityLower viscosity, flows easily at lower temperaturesHigher viscosity, suitable for high-pressure systems operating at higher temperatures
Performance ImpactUsing 46 oil in a high-pressure system designed for 68 oil can cause energy wastage, decreased performance, and excessive resistance to flow.Using 68 oil in a low-pressure system designed for 46 oil can cause reduced efficiency, increased wear and tear, and damage to the system’s components.
Suitable ApplicationsLow-pressure systems operating at lower temperaturesHigh-pressure systems operating at higher temperatures
Component CompatibilityMake sure to use the appropriate hydraulic oil grade that is compatible with your system’s components to prevent damage and decreased performance.Make sure to use the appropriate hydraulic oil grade that is compatible with your system’s components to prevent damage and decreased performance.
Regular MaintenanceRegular maintenance, including oil changes, can help ensure that your hydraulic system operates at optimal levels and avoids unnecessary wear and tear.Regular maintenance, including oil changes, can help ensure that your hydraulic system operates at optimal levels and avoids unnecessary wear and tear.
Expert ConsultationIf you’re unsure about which hydraulic oil grade to choose or have any other questions about your hydraulic system, consult with experts who can provide guidance and recommendations.If you’re unsure about which hydraulic oil grade to choose or have any other questions about your hydraulic system, consult with experts who can provide guidance and recommendations.

Can You Mix 46 and 68 Hydraulic Oil?

No, you should not mix 46 and 68 hydraulic oil.

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Mixing 46 and 68 hydraulic oil is not recommended as it can cause inconsistent viscosity, leading to excessive wear and tear on hydraulic system components, increased friction, and potential system failure. 

also, the chemical properties of the oil may change, causing corrosion and rust, which can result in premature equipment failure and costly repairs. 

To ensure optimal system performance and prevent damage to hydraulic components, it’s best to avoid mixing different viscosity grades of hydraulic oil. If you have any questions about your hydraulic system, it’s always a good idea to consult experts who can provide guidance and recommendations.

Can You Mix 46 And 68 Hydraulic Oil 1 -

What Happens If You Mix 46 and 68 Hydraulic Oil?

Mixing different viscosity grades of hydraulic oil can negatively affect your hydraulic system.

When 46 and 68 hydraulic oil is mixed, it can result in reduced performance, component damage, contamination, and potential system failure.

Reduced Performance:

Mixing 46 and 68 hydraulic oil can cause inconsistent viscosity, increasing friction and reducing system efficiency.

The oil’s chemical properties may also change, resulting in a decreased ability to lubricate hydraulic components and reduced system performance.

Component Damage:

Inconsistent viscosity caused by mixing 46 and 68 hydraulic oil can cause excessive wear and tear on hydraulic components, potentially damaging the system’s critical parts.

This damage can cause hydraulic system failure and result in costly repairs and downtime.

Contamination and System Failure:

Mixing 46 and 68 hydraulic oil can cause contamination and degradation of the oil, resulting in system failure.

Contaminated oil can cause corrosion, rust, and damage to hydraulic system components, leading to costly repairs and downtime.

Learn More: Can I Use PAG 100 Instead Of PAG 46?

Best Practices for Mixing Hydraulic Oil

Here are some step-by-step guidelines for mixing hydraulic oil:

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Check the Manufacturer’s Recommendations:

The first step is to check the manufacturer’s recommendations for the type, grade, and viscosity of hydraulic oil compatible with your system.

The manufacturer will provide specific information on the recommended oil to ensure optimal system performance.

Check the Viscosity Index:

Check the viscosity index of the hydraulic oil before mixing. Mixing hydraulic oils with different viscosity indexes can cause inconsistent viscosity, reducing performance and component damage.

Choose hydraulic oils with similar viscosity indexes.

Drain the System:

Before mixing hydraulic oils, drain the system completely to prevent any contamination from the old oil.

Contamination can lead to system failure or damage, so starting with a clean system is essential.

Add the New Oil:

Once you have the correct hydraulic oil, add it to the system according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Make sure you add the correct amount and avoid overfilling the system.

Run the System:

Once you have added the new oil, run the hydraulic system to allow the oil to circulate throughout the system.

Check the system for any leaks or issues that may have occurred during the mixing process.

Learn More: What Oil Can I Use For Hydraulic Jack?

Can You Use 46 and 68 Hydraulic Oil in the Same System?

Yes, you can use 46 and 68 hydraulic oil together in the same system, but it’s not recommended. Using two different viscosity grades can affect the hydraulic system’s performance, and it may cause damage or contamination. 

However, it may be necessary to use a mixture of two different viscosity grades in some cases.

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Compatibility between Viscosity Grades:

The viscosity grade is an essential factor when it comes to hydraulic oil. Hydraulic oil with different viscosity grades has different flow properties and can cause system damage or failure.

Therefore, checking the compatibility between the two different viscosity grades before mixing them is crucial.

Benefits of Using 46 and 68 Hydraulic Oil Together:

Mixing 46 and 68 hydraulic oil can provide some benefits.

  • 46 hydraulic oil has better flow properties and is more suited for low-temperature operations, while 68 hydraulic oil is better suited for high-temperature applications.
  • Mixing the two can achieve better viscosity properties and maintain system performance in a broader temperature range.

Summary

In conclusion, while mixing hydraulic oil is not recommended, combining 46 and 68 hydraulic oil is possible under certain circumstances. 

However, following best practices, such as checking compatibility, viscosity index, and avoiding mixing different brands and grades, is essential to minimize potential risks and ensure optimal system performance. 

It’s always best to consult with the manufacturer or a hydraulic system expert before mixing hydraulic oil to ensure proper usage and avoid costly damage.

Frequently Asked Questions

Can I Mix Different Hydraulic Oils? 

It is not recommended to mix different hydraulic oils as they may not be compatible, leading to reduced performance, component damage, and even system failure. If you need to mix hydraulic oils, following the manufacturer’s recommendations, checking the viscosity index, and avoiding mixing different brands and grades are crucial.

What Happens if You Mix Different Hydraulic Oils? 

Mixing different hydraulic oils can cause inconsistent viscosity, leading to reduced performance, component damage, contamination, and even system failure. Following the manufacturer’s recommendations and avoiding mixing different brands and grades is essential to ensure optimal system performance.

Can You Use Two Different Viscosity Grades of Hydraulic Oil in the Same System? 

It is possible to use two different viscosity grades of hydraulic oil in the same system, but it is crucial to check the viscosity index before doing so. Mixing hydraulic oils with a similar viscosity index can help avoid inconsistent viscosity, reducing performance and component damage.

What is the Best Way to Change Hydraulic Oil?

Following the manufacturer’s recommendations is the best way to change hydraulic oil. Typically, this involves draining the existing oil, replacing the filter, and filling the system with the recommended hydraulic oil. It is crucial to dispose of the used oil properly and avoid contaminating the environment.

How Often Should Hydraulic Oil Be Changed? 

The frequency of hydraulic oil changes depends on several factors, including the type of hydraulic system, operating conditions, and the manufacturer’s recommendations. In general, hydraulic oil should be changed every 1000-2000 hours of operation or annually, whichever comes first.

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